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The Valid Fallacy

Interests: Educational, Social, Neuro Psychology, Education, Writing, Reading, Science, Math, Art, Photography

Politics: Liberal/Feminist/Atheist/Humanist

Fan of: Batman, DC & Marvel Comics, Star Trek, Star Wars, The Office, Doctor Who, Sherlock, & other things.

Personal: Graduate in Communicology, Happily Married since 07/07/2012
Jul 29 '14
waywardwes9:

I feel we’re making some progress in LGBTQ rights

waywardwes9:

I feel we’re making some progress in LGBTQ rights

Jul 29 '14
Jul 28 '14

evmlove:

damecatoe:

"By far, one of the best scenes in the book is where Kaling writes about the photo shoot she and Office co-star Ellie Kemper did for People’s Most Beautiful issue. When the stylist brought a trailer full of size zero gowns, Kaling found herself crying in the children’s bathroom of the public school where the photo shoot was happening. In the bathroom stall, she discovered a smear of what looked like excrement and a child’s graffiti: “This school is bulls–t!” which made her a) laugh and b) demand that the stylist alter one of the gowns to fit her. In the end photo, she’s smiling in a gorgeous fuchsia dress that the stylist had to rip down the back and alter with canvas. Looking at beautiful Kaling, though, you’d never know. It’s a sweet moment of chubby girl victory.” (via afterellen)

This is the story that truly made her my hero.

Jul 28 '14
sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

Jul 28 '14
Jul 28 '14

designrevolution:

Courtenay McKay created a series of posters for the Gender Based Violence Prevention Project (GBVPP) at the University of Alberta to spread awareness about rape culture.

The Gender Based Violence Prevention Project is a new project of the Students’ Union that promotes a campus free of gender based violence. Gender Based Violence exists in both visible and invisible ways on our campus and affects the lives of many University students, staff, faculty, and community members. Through education, awareness, and institutional change, we are striving to create a campus free of gender based violence where everyone can feel safe and supported.”

Jul 28 '14
"Wonder Woman is there to kick ass not give you a boner"
favorite response to some dude saying the Wonder Woman costume isn’t sexy enough on Facebook (via agentturner)
Jul 28 '14

thislifeintransit:

Can I have a dog please?

(Source: vicious-seamonkey)

Jul 28 '14
teachthemhowtothink:

thesubversiveatheist:

academicatheism:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds
Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.
Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.
The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.
By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.
“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.
Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”
According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.
More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

Oh, gee, look at how shocked I am.

Filed under: Why I’m a Secular Parent #738.

teachthemhowtothink:

thesubversiveatheist:

academicatheism:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds

Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.

Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.

The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.

By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.

“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.

Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”

According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.

More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

Oh, gee, look at how shocked I am.

Filed under: Why I’m a Secular Parent #738.

(Source: The Huffington Post)

Jul 28 '14
breakingnews:

NC to stop fighting challenges to marriage amendment
WRAL: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper said his office would no longer oppose challenges to the state’s constitutional amendment outlawing same-sex marriage.
The announcement comes after a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Virginia’s constitutional and statutory provisions barring gay marriage and denying recognition of such unions performed in other states violate the U.S. Constitution. 
Follow updates on Breaking News.
Photo: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (WRAL)

breakingnews:

NC to stop fighting challenges to marriage amendment

WRAL: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper said his office would no longer oppose challenges to the state’s constitutional amendment outlawing same-sex marriage.

The announcement comes after a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Virginia’s constitutional and statutory provisions barring gay marriage and denying recognition of such unions performed in other states violate the U.S. Constitution.

Follow updates on Breaking News.

Photo: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (WRAL)